Article Abstract

Lung function impairment is not associated with the severity of acute coronary syndrome but is associated with a shorter stay in the coronary care unit

Authors: Fernando Casas-Méndez, Alicia Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Joan Valls, Manuel Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Jorge Abad, Joaquin Duran-Cantolla, Valentin Cabriada, Juan Fernando Masa, Joaquin Teran, Gerard Castella, Fernando Worner, Ferran Barbé, on behalf of the Spanish Sleep Network

Abstract

Background: Previous population-based studies have suggested that lung function impairment (LFI) could be associated with an increase in the mortality of cardiovascular events.
Methods: We evaluated the association between LFI and the severity and short-term prognosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). LFI was established through presence of a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or a forced vital capacity (FVC) less than 80% of predicted.
Results: Seventy-one LFI subjects (61.45±10.70 years, 83.10% males) and 247 non-LFI subjects (58.98±11.18 years, 80.57% males) with ACS were included. Subjects with LFI exhibited a higher prevalence of systemic hypertension (57.75% vs. 40.89%, P=0.02) and tobacco exposure (28.50±26.67 vs. 18.21±19.83 pack-years, P=0.007). No significant differences between groups were found regarding the severity of ACS (ejection fraction, Killip class, number of affected vessels, and peak plasma troponin). However, in comparison to non-LFI subjects, a significantly shorter length of stay in the coronary care unit (CCU) was observed in the LFI group (1.83±1.10 vs. 2.24±1.21 days, P=0.01) and this was even shorter in subjects with obstructive LFI (1.62±1.17 days, P=0.009). When considering obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), an interaction with length of stay was found, revealing that OSA subjects with obstructive LFI had the shortest length of stay in the CCU (0.60±0.89 days, P=0.05) also in comparison to non-LFI.
Conclusions: This study indicates a possible association between LFI and a shorter length of stay in the CCU but does not show a significant association with ACS severity.