Article Abstract

Age-stratified sex differences in polysomnographic findings and pharyngeal morphology among children with obstructive sleep apnea

Authors: Ayako Inoshita, Takatoshi Kasai, Rina Matsuoka, Naoko Sata, Nanako Shiroshita, Fusae Kawana, Mitsue Kato, Katsuhisa Ikeda

Abstract

Background: Childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has important implications for growth, learning, behavior, cognition and cardiovascular health as well as snoring and OSA in adulthood. In this study, we elucidated the sex differences in polysomnographic (PSG) findings and pharyngeal radiographic data in pediatric OSA patients.
Methods: Sixty three children (age between 3 and 15 years old) with OSA [defined as apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥1/h by polysomnography] were enrolled. Lateral neck radiographs were obtained from the patients. All subjects were separated by age: pre-adolescent group (3–8 years old) and adolescent group (9–15 years old).
Results: Overall, 45 patients in the pre-adolescent group (33 boys and 12 girls) and 18 patients in the adolescent group (10 boys and 8 girls) were enrolled, and sex differences were compared in each group. We found sex differences in craniofacial features and severity of OSA in the adolescent group, in which girls with OSA had more upper airway space, in addition to lower AHI, lower 3% oxygen desaturation index (ODI), higher minimum SO2 and better sleep efficiency than the boys.
Conclusions: The present study found revealed sex differences in pediatric OSA patients in the adolescent group. Girls in the adolescent group had more upper airway space in addition to lower AHI, lower 3% ODI, higher minimum SO2 and better sleep efficiency than boys.

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