Article Abstract

Coronary artery anatomy in peri-crux cordis area on computed coronary tomography angiography

Authors: Ming-Xing Xu, Jin-Mei Liu, Yong-Ming He, Xiang-Jun Yang, Yong-Gang Li, Chang Liu, Xin Zhao, Chao Wei, Hai-Peng Wang, Jing-Fen Zhu

Abstract

Background: The peri-crux area is an anatomical structure of the heart. Unfortunately, important information on this area mainly derives from autopsy heart with a small, under-representative sample size, resulting in limited clinical applications. Furthermore, little has been done to standardize the definition of the peri-crux area on coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) images or to investigate coronary artery anatomy wherein potential values are attracting experienced inventional cardiologists in terms of the revascularization strategies. The current study aimed to identify the peri-crux cordis area and to observe coronary artery anatomical distributions in this area on CCTA.
Methods: A total of 1,006 consecutive patients undergoing CCTA exams were enrolled. We delineated the peri-crux cordis area based on the posterior interatrial sulcus, posterior interventricular sulcus (PIS), left and right posterior atrioventricular groove on the diaphragmatic surface of the heart. Then we observed the coronary artery distributions in the peri-crux cordis area in different sexes.
Results: We have defined the peri-crux cordis area according to the anatomical landmarks on the diaphragmatic surface of the heart on CCTA images. We have observed 8 coronary artery distributions in the peri-crux cordis area. Right dominance has 4 types (types 1–4); left, 1 type (type 0) and balanced, 3 types (types 5–7). Out of the 1,006 cases, the type 1 is commonest with 834 cases (82.9%). There are no statistically significant differences in terms of coronary dominances and coronary artery distributions in the peri-crux cordis area between sexes (P>0.05).
Conclusions: We have defined the peri-crux cordis area utilizing the anatomical landmarks of the heart on CCTA images, where 8 types of coronary artery distributions have been identified. The current study may provide interventional cardiologists with useful information on recognition of coronary artery dominance, use of collateral channels for revascularization of chronic total occluded lesions, and evaluation of prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).