Article Abstract

Questionnaire survey comparing surgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer: lessons from patients with experience of both modalities

Authors: Atsuya Takeda, Naoko Sanuki, Yuichiro Tsurugai, Masataka Taguri, Nobuyuki Horita, Yu Hara, Takahisa Eriguchi, Takeshi Akiba, Akitomo Sugawara, Etsuo Kunieda, Takeshi Kaneko

Abstract

Background: Currently, there is some controversy regarding indications for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer patients. We investigated the treatment preferences of patients with experience of both surgery and SBRT using a questionnaire survey.
Methods: Of lung cancer patients treated with SBRT between 2005 and 2017, we identified those who also previously underwent surgery for lung cancer. These patients were asked about their experiences of surgery and SBRT including perceived condition, distress, stress, convenience, adverse effects, and satisfaction during and after treatment. Participants were also asked about treatment decision-making for hypothetical scenarios.
Results: Of 653 lung cancer patients treated with SBRT, 149 also underwent surgery for lung cancer, 52 of whom participated in this questionnaire. The median age at the time of this survey was 76 years (range, 59–91 years). Significantly more participants had a favorable impression of SBRT during and after treatment (all question items; P<0.01). In terms of overall satisfaction, 27 patients preferred SBRT and three patients preferred surgery. In a hypothetical scenario (equivalent treatment outcomes) aged 70 years and faced with decision-making for first-time lung cancer treatment, significantly more patients selected SBRT (P<0.01): 38 patients selected SBRT. In a scenario with 20% better survivals for surgical resection, 14 patients selected SBRT, 12 selected surgery, and 26 were indecisive (P=0.47). In a scenario at age 80 years, significantly more patients selected SBRT (P<0.01).
Conclusions: Most patients with experience of both surgery and SBRT for lung cancer prefer SBRT. This information would be helpful at treatment decision-making.

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