Article Abstract

Effect of nicotine dependence on quality of life and sleep quality in patients with lung cancer who continue to smoke after diagnosis

Authors: Fen Gu, Xue-Fei Li, Jin-Fu Xu, Guang-Hui Gao, Yi-Fan Wu, Cai-Cun Zhou

Abstract

Background: Hundreds of millions of Chinese individuals continue to smoke and rates of lung cancer still continue to rise. However, there were few studies that examined the effects of nicotine dependence on quality of life (QOL) and sleep quality in lung cancer patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of nicotine dependence on QOL and sleep quality in lung cancer patients who continue to smoke after diagnosis.
Methods: This cross-sectional survey study included 202 patients with lung cancer. Smokers were separated into two groups based on the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine dependence: the low dependence (LD) (<4 score) group (n=59) and the high dependence (HD) (≥4 score) group (n=143). Both Chinese version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and Chinese version of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were used to evaluate the two groups of lung cancer patients. Then we analyzed the difference of QOL and sleep quality between two distinct nicotine dependence groups.
Results: Physical functioning, role functioning, emotional functioning, cognitive functioning, global health status and social functioning items in the LD group were significantly higher than the HD group (P<0.001). Fatigue, nausea/vomiting, pain, dyspnea, insomnia, appetite loss, diarrhea and financial problems in the LD group were significantly lower than those in the HD group (P<0.001). Significantly higher scores in the HD group were found concerning the three sleep components including sleep duration, sleep efficiency and daytime function. The mean global PSQI score in the HD group was significantly higher than the LD group (P=0.014).
Conclusions: These findings suggest that lung cancer patients who continue to smoke after diagnosis should receive health education in order to improve their QOL and quality of sleep after the word education. This can be useful for clinicians and nurses who are trying to motivate smokers to quit smoking.