Mediastino-hepato-renal cystic lymphangiomas—diagnostic and surgical considerations

Khalil Ahmad, Henrik Vad, Thomas D. Christensen

Abstract

Cystic lymphangiomas or hygromas are rare benign vascular tumours, caused by congenital malformation of the lymphatic vessels. It appears as a progressive swelling in the head or neck of children during 2-5 years of life, yet rarely seen in the mediastinum or abdomen. Symptomatic mediastinal cystic lymphangiomas provide symptoms such as chest pain, breathlessness, cough, and dysphagia, making it difficult to differentiate from other mediastinal tumours. The tumour can become larger due to infections, inflammations, obstructions and bleedings. Chest X-ray, ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide helpful information but the diagnosis appears merely after surgical resection and histological examination. Only a few cases have been reported. Hence, we report the first case of a mediastinal and asymptomatic renal and multiple hepatic cystic lymphangiomas in a 71-yearold male with respiratory symptoms and sever reduction in lung capacity. The symptoms regressed fully after surgical excision and lung diffusions capacity increased significantly.